skraafoto-N.jpg
skraafoto-S.jpg
skraafoto-E.jpg
skraafoto-W.jpg

En rigtig Kalø Vig klassiker der for det mest holder fisk. Man parkere ved de 3 huse og følger markvejen ned til den første pynt.

Der fiskes fra pynten og så ellers derudad, syd på. Det kan godt betale at fiske helt ud til indsejlingen.

Bottom conditions
Varied

A coastal spot with varied bottom conditions is often a good place to find the fish. In different seasons of the year, the fish prefer different bottom conditions – depending on weather conditions and the presence of food options. For that reason, choosing spots with varied bottom conditions can prove effective, since you’re almost sure to find fish nearby.

Rip channels

A rip channel is a deeper area between coast and bar, or an underwater groove of a significant depth. A rip channel usually has a dark bottom shaped by rocks and bladder wrack, but it can also consist of pure sand or gravel. You can’t avoid finding these rip channels on the coast, since they are some of the most common bottom conditions in Danish waters. The size of a rip channel varies greatly. Even the smallest rip channels, only a few meters wide, can contain many fish. The sea trout swims around these rip channels to hunt for food. In line with the tide, the fish cross the bars to reach the rip channel that’s closest to land, since that often contains the most food options.

Reef

Formations of rocks, gravel, or sand created by current, wind, and weather form a compressed and lifted seabed, which provides fish with optimal conditions. There is often a huge water flow on these reefs. The depth is often greater on the sides of a reef, which means that the current will often be stronger there. Shoals of smaller fish roam in proximity to reefs in order to hunt, since the small food options are whirled around in the current. In their wake, the sea trout and other predatory fish follow. Reefs are useful spots year round, and they are optimal stops for sea trout when they migrate. Spending more time than usual on such a spot can easily be worth it.

Rocks

Even though walking around on rocks along the coast may feel annoying, it’s often a good indicator of the presence of optimal bottom conditions for the sea trout and its food options. Everything from pebble to huge chunks of granite provides cover for sand hoppers, shrimp, and small fish. If there are waves, these food options are easily whirled up into the water column. A rocky bottom can be good all year round, but especially so during the cold months with few food options in the deeper water. A rocky bottom at a good depth also attracts other predatory fish such as cod and garfish.

Sand

In many fishing spots, large areas of the bottom are covered in sand, and often the coastal angler will skip these areas since they don’t seem like much. However, it’s worth considering that many small fish like sand eel and sprat often migrate across the sand bottom, and they have sea trout and other predatory fish chasing them. On days with waves, unclear water, or dimmed lighting, you’ll likely find predatory fish in these areas. The sandy areas along the deeper water or close to dark areas can be true sea trout magnets.

Bladder wrack

Along with the eelgrass, bladder wrack is the most prevalent aquatic plant along the Danish shores. This seaweed attaches itself to smooth surfaces such as rocks, gravel, and other variations on the bottom. The bladder wrack is a good hiding place for food options and fish. Bottom conditions with bladder wrack are good indicators of fish being nearby.

Fishing license

You must have a valid national fishing license to fish here. Buy your fishing license via the link below.

Season

Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Season is only indicative and you must always read up on conservation times for the individual species and fishing spots.

Species

Sea trout
Garfish

Forecast